A Connecticut Estate With Animal Menagerie Seeks $13.75 Million - What Are The Most Important Features To Look For In A New Haven Apartment?
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A Connecticut Estate With Animal Menagerie Seeks $13.75 Million

A Connecticut Estate With Animal Menagerie Seeks $13.75 Million

A Connecticut estate on roughly 187 acres—and home to a menagerie of animals including peacocks, pheasants and parrots—is going on the market for $13.75 million.

Known as Cobble Hill Farm, the property is about 100 miles outside New York City in West Cornwall, a small village that attracts affluent weekenders, according to Carolyn Klemm of Klemm Real Estate, who has the listing with colleague Roger Saucy. The property is one of the most expensive on the market in Litchfield County, she said.

The estate includes a brick Georgian Manor house originally built around 1860 and expanded over the years. The four-bedroom house measures about 6,400 square feet, with a covered walkway leading to a studio. The grounds include two guesthouses, an office and a “sugar shack” for making maple syrup from trees on the property. There is a tennis court and a heated swimming pool.

A Connecticut estate known as Cobble Hill Farm is about 100 miles outside New York City in West Cornwall, Conn., a small village that attracts affluent weekenders. Photo: Jonathan Simons/Hudsonhometours

Three large barns house a variety of animals. In addition to typical farm animals like horses and goats, there is also a dedicated room for pigeons plus an enclosure for three peacocks and two different kinds of pheasants. Parrots and finches live in the sunroom of the main house.

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The animal-loving owners are Ira B. Shapiro, 77, and Jacqueline Dedell, 70. They worked in publishing and have a range of other investments, and they also previously raised and bred ponies and horses, Mr. Shapiro said. “It was not a conventional, straightforward kind of life,” he said. They bought the property in 2001 for around $5 million and have restored the house and grounds, Mr. Shapiro said, adding that they invested around $1 million in upgrades to the farm over the years.

The couple is selling because their children are grown and they want to downsize, Mr. Shapiro said, adding that they would consider selling the animals along with the farm.

Write to Candace Taylor at Candace.Taylor@wsj.com

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